Agricultural Administration Course Synopsis

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CHM 101:    INTRODUCTORY PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY                (3 Units)
Atoms, molecules and structures.  Electronic configuration.  Periodicity and building up of the periodic table.  Chemical reactions, chemical equations and stoichiometry.  Bonding and intermolecular forces.  Kinetic theory of matter;  derivation and calculation of all the laws involved. Thermochemistry and simple calculations based on Hess’s law.  Rate of reaction.  Chemical equilibrium. Oxidation-Reduction reaction.  Chemical kinetics, equilibra  and  related simple calculation .  Important applications of equilibra like pH, Solubility.  Solubility of ionic solids. Electrochemistry and workings of various cells, Corrosion.

CHM 102:  INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY      (2 Units)
Tetravalency of carbon.  Structure, molecular composition and variety of carbon compounds.  Functional group classes of carbon compounds.   The chemistry of alkanes and petroleum, alkenes including ozonolysis, alkynes, benzene, alcohols including phenols, aldehydes, ketones, acids, amines and their derivatives.  Structure of simple sugars, starch and cellulose, peptides and proteins.  Synthetic polymers from various classes of compounds.  Mechanisms of reactions discussed in all cases and uses of compounds.

CHM 104:  INTRODUCTORY INORGANIC CHEMISTRY   (2 Units)
Hybridization and shapes of simple molecules including carbon compounds.  Extraction of the metals.  Comparative Chemistry of group 1A (alkali metals). IIA (alkaline earth metals) and IVA (carbon group) elements.  Introduction to transition metal chemistry and nuclear chemistry. Acids, bases and salts.

MTS 105:    ALGEBRA AND TRIGONOMETRY FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (3 Units)
Use of Mathematics in Agriculture. Elementary Set Theory:  Set notations.  Set operations.  Algebra of sets.  Venn diagram.  Applications.  Operations with Real Numbers: Indices and Logarithms.  Surds.  Use of Logarithms in Agricultural Sciences.  Remainder and Factor theorems.  Partial Fractions.  Equations and Inequalities: Linear and Quadratic inequalities.  Theory of quadratic equations.  Cubic Equations.  Equations reducible to Quadratic type.  Sequences and Series: Arithmetic and Geometric Progression.  Arithmetic mean and Geometric mean.  Arithmetic Series.  Geometric series.  nth term of a series.  Binomial theorem.  The General term. Binomial series.  Matrix Algebra: Matrices.  Algebra of Matrices.  Determinant of a Matrix.  Properties.  Inverse of a matrix.  Solution of Linear system of Equations.  Elementary Trigonometry: Degree and Radian Measures. Pythagorean Identities. Trigonometric functions of any Angle.  Graphs. Inverse trigonometric functions.  Compound Angles.  Solution of trigonometric Equations.
MTS 106:         CALCULUS FOR BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES   (3 Units)
Functions in Agriculture.  Domain and Range of a function.  Graphs of Elementary functions.  One-to-one and Onto Functions.  Composite function.  Applications to Agricultural Sciences.  Limits and Continuity: Limits.  Algebra of Limits.  Continuity and discontinuity of functions.  Removable discontinuity.  Differentiation:  Geometrical meaning of derivatives.  Algebra of differentiable functions.  Implicit differentiation.  Logarithmic differentiation.  Higher derivatives etc.  Applications of derivatives:  Errors and Approximations.  Minima and Maxima.  Curve sketching etc.  Applications to Agricultural Sciences.  Integration as Inverse of Differentiation.  Indefinite and Definite Integrals.  Properties.  Methods of Integration.  Applications as area under a curve.  Surface Areas and volumes of solids of Integration.  Applications as area under a curve.  Surface Areas and volumes of solids of revolution etc.  Co-ordinate Geometry: Slope and midpoint of a line.  Equations of a straight line.  Parallel and perpendicular lines.  Equations of a circle, Parabola, Ellipse and hyperbola.  Tangents and Normal

PHS 105:  PHYSICS FOR AGRICULTURE AND BIOLOGICAL STUDENTS I (3 Units)
Linear motion.  Motion in a circle and simple harmonic motion.  Gravitation, statics and hydrostatics, elasticity, friction, viscosity and surface tension.  Heat, temperature and thermometers.  Expansion of solids, liquid and gases.  The gas laws, change of state, kinetic theory of matter.  Heat transfer.

PHS 106:  PHYSICS FOR AGRICULTURE AND BIOLOGICAL STUDENTS II (3 Units)
Waves and Resonance – Propagation of light at plane and curved surface.  The human eye and optical instruments.  Radioactivity and useful effects of radiation.  Current and static elasticity, introductory magnetism and alternating currents.  Introductory atomic physics and electronics.

PHS 191/192:     PHYSICS LABORATORY I/II     (1 Unit Each)
Selected experiments relating to the theoretical courses PHS 101/102.  The experiments should illustrate basic techniques, observations, quantitative measurement, graphical representation, analysis and deductions from the data and error analysis.  They must also acquaint students with a cross-section of basic measuring instruments.

PCP 101: INTRODUCTORY PLANT PHYSIOLOGY     (2 Units)
Nature of living organisms; Plant nutrition, elements and their functions; Uptake of nutrients; Sources of metabolites; Chemosynthesis and photosynthesis; Cycles of raw materials (nitrogen cycles); Respiration; Method of elimination of waste material of production in plants; Plant hormones; homeostasis, osmoregulation in plants; Reproduction (sexual and asexual); Growth and development, patterns of growth, factors affecting growth, flowering and fruit growth; Enzymes (properties/characteristics, composition, types, mechanism of action, estimates of rates, inhibitors).

PCP 191: BASIC PLANT PHYSIOLOGY PRACTICAL (1 Unit)

Use and handling of the compound microscope (examination of the microscope, setting up of the lower and higher power, using the microscope, depth of the field and optical section, examination of objects under the microscope); Plant cell: basic cell structure, plant anatomy and morphology, Cell division: mitosis and meiosis; Plant growth analysis: hormones and growth regulators, Bacteria, Fungi, algae, bryophytes, pteridophytes, angiosperms, Movement of ions and molecules into and out of cells, Stomata, Enzymes, Test for carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; determination of water potential, detection of starch in leaves.

ANP 101: INTRODUCTORY ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY I    (2 Units)
Characteristics of living things; Cellular basis of life: Cell organelles; Cell cycle, Cell division, Cell growth, Cell death; Classification of Animal Kingdom, Grades of Organization, A brief introduction of the various Animal Phyla: Protozoa Coelenterata, Porifera, Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Annelida, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, and Chordata.

ANP 102: INTRODUCTORY ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY II       (2 Units)
Nature of Living Organisms/Activities of Living Things: Homeostasis, Growth and Development. Physiological systems in Mammals and Birds: Nervous, Endocrine, Respiratory, Circulatory, Reproductive, Digestive and Excretory systems.

ANP 192: BASIC ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY PRACTICAL     (1 Unit)

Classification of Animals: Brief introduction and study of representatives from various animal phyla: Protozoa, Coelenterata, Porifera, Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Annelida, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata and Chordata. Levels of organization, habitats, physical characteristics, evolutionary position
Animal cell: Basic cell structure, identification of cell organelles.
Mammalian and avian body systems: Nervous, Digestive, Respiratory, Endocrine, Reproductive, Circulatory and Excretory systems.
Determination of pulse rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature of farm animals.

AEM 102:    PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS         (2 Units)
The need for economics; General Principles of Demand and Supply; the Concept of Production Theory; Economics of Cooperation; Development and Planning Economics of Agriculture.

GNS 101:   USE-OF-ENGLISH                           (2 Units)
The course is designed to equip students with listening, speaking and reading language skills which will enable them to comprehend their lectures fully and accomplish their reading tasks. The course is task-based and student-oriented

Course Content:
1.    Awareness Raising:
To sensitize students on the need for the course by examining some errors in students’ scripts.  
To examine some differences between formal and informal English.

2.      Listening Skill:
To help students develop some note-taking skills and strategies.  
To help students anticipate the subject–matter of a lecture from the topic.  
To distinguish main from minor points.  
To follow a teacher’s train of thought using lexical and structural signals.  
To match verbal clues with pictures.

3.      Speaking Skill:
To minimize and eliminate first language interference.  
To help students pronounce vowel and consonant sounds correctly.    
To identify dark/silent letters.  
To enable students use stress and intonation appropriately.

4.    Word Classes:
To emphasize correct use of nouns, verbs, adverbs, pronouns, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions, interjections and exclamations.  
To encourage correct agreement in grammatical structures.  
To point attention to common errors and locate the sources of such errors.
5.      Punctuation Marks:
To identify different kinds of punctuation marks.
To facilitate the correct use of punctuation marks in writing.

6.    Reading Skill:
To develop fast reading in students.  
To enhance and improve comprehension for specific and main ideas; reference and critical interpretations.  
To facilitate vocabulary development.

7.      Application of the above Skill:
To study two prescribed texts (short prose).

GNS 102:   INTRODUCTION TO NIGERIA HISTORY (1 Unit)
The course provides an overview of Nigeria’s contribution to world history and her relationship with other parts of the world.  It focuses on the following:  Sources of Nigerian history, Methodology of history; major landmarks in early  Nigerian History (Nok, Igbo-Ukwu, Ife, Benin, etc).  Emphasis is on the scientific and technological development of these early Nigerian societies.  Students will also be exposed to pre-colonial history:  Sudanese/Nigerian states; the Slave trade and its effects; colonial and post-colonial history of Nigeria.  Attempts are made to relate the discussion to agriculture, with special reference to the introduction of cash crops, industrialization and urbanization processes.

Course Content:

(a)    Methodology of History
(b)    Sources of Nigerian History
History of Non-Literate Societies
Early Nigerian Cultures and Society
Nok,  Igbo-Ukwu, Ife, Benin, others.
(c)    Pre-colonial Societies
(i)    Sudanese Empires
(ii)    Forest States

(d)    Nigeria’s Early Contact with the World
The Trans-Saharan and Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and their effects.

(e)    Scramble For Africa
British interest in Nigeria
The British conquest of Nigeria
Colonial rule and its impact on Nigeria
(i)    Political
(ii)    Economic
(iii)    Social

(f)    Decolonization Process in Nigeria
(i)    Rise of Nationalism
(ii)    Culture and Political dimension
(iii)    Economic Dimension

(g)    Development in Nigeria after independence


GNS 103:   INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PROBLEMS (2 Units)

The course will present students with current perspectives on the nature and cause of contemporary social problems and possible ways of solving them.  The approach is meant to help students to use their reasoning ability in a way that would help them to better understand the causes of our social problems; by so doing, students will be able to make decisions that will contribute to an improvement in the quality of life in Nigerian society.  Since the sociological approach is not the only approach which offers useful insight about social problems, an eclectic approach will be adopted in this course. That is, in addition to a variety of sociological perspectives diverse views to social problems will be considered.  Thus, where relevant, the course will rely on other social science disciplines such as anthropology, psychology, political science, economics and indeed some of the natural sciences.

Course Content:
What is social problem? The sociological approach to the study of social problems. Problems of inequality. Prejudice, discrimination and ethnicism/racism. Deviance (Collective behaviour and substance abuse).  Problems of environment and energy.  Population and Urbanisation. Education and Social Problems. Health and HIV/AIDS related issues.


200 LEVEL COURSES
PCP 201:     Principles of Crop Production        (3 Units)

History Of Agriculture And Its Relationships With Other Sciences. Agricultural Ecology: Ecosystem And Distribution Of Vegetation And Animals. Cropping Systems, Tillage Practices – Conventional, Minimum, No-Tillage. Farm Tools And Machinery, Farm Buildings And Structures. General  Production Practices Of Field Crops. Derivation And  Characteristics Of The Common Varieties Of Cereals, Grain  Legumes And Pulses, Roots And Tuber Species, Plantains And Bananas.  Insect Orders And Diseases Of Economic Importance In Crop Production In The Tropics. Seed Viability, Dormancy, Germination Testing. Crop Propagation: Seed And Vegetative. General Role Of Extension In Crop Production.  

Practicals: Identification, usage and maintenance of farm tools and machinery.  Identification of seeding materials of arable crops propagated by seed, sett, stem, vine, root, sucker corms and cormel and rhizomes etc. Methods of seed viability  testing. Dormancy: causes and how to overcome them.   Identification/collection  of weed, insects and plant diseases of economic importance. Field practices on various cultural management practices: land preparation, seeding, weeding, insect control fertilization, harvesting etc.

PCP 202:  Anatomy, Taxonomy and Physiology of Agricultural Plants (3 Units)

Classification of Agricultural Plants, Divisions: Phyla, class, order, family, genus, species.  
Microscope and its use; plant cell structures and organelles. Development of cells and tissues; comparative anatomy of major plant organs. Enzymes. Seed germination and dormancy. Respiration and energy balance of crops. Photosynthesis, translocation and assimilate distribution in relation to yield determination. Water relations. Plant growth substances and their role in crop production.

Practicals: Use of microscope: plant cell structure and organelles. Root, stem, leaf, anatomy of dicots and monocots. Growth curve and growth analysis. Data analysis and interpretation.
SOS 211:       PRINCIPLES OF SOIL SCIENCE        (2 Units)
Definition of soil; soil genesis and formation. History of Soil Science. Basic principles of soil survey and classification. Soil survey information and land-use planning. Soil colloids and soil reaction; Soil nutrients and mineral nutrition of plants.  Soil organic matter; types and activities of soil organisms.  Organic and Inorganic fertilizers; nutrient management. Soil texture and soil structure. Soil management; tillage practices; soil water management; irrigation; drainage and soil erosion control

Practical: Identification of different rocks and minerals; Soil profile description and classification using monoliths; Identification  of basic soil fertilizer. Textural classification by feel.

AEM 201:    PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (2 Units)
Application of Basic Economic Principles of Agriculture; Supply and Demand; Price Determination an Elasticities; Formulation of Models; Factor-Product; Factor-Factor, and Product-Product and their Optimum Conditions; Linear Programming; Agricultural Linkages; Vertical/Horizontal Integration.

ARD202: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AND RURAL SOCIOLOGY (3 Units)

Basic concepts and principles of rural sociology and their application to an understanding of rural situations, rural society, patterns of relationships, the family, societal maintenance and inheritance, principles and processes of community development; philosophy, objectives, principles, processes and methods of agricultural extension, extension administration, programme planning and evaluation, concepts and principles of the training and visit (T and V) system of extension.

GNS 201:    WRITING AND LITERARY APPRECIATION (2 Units)
The course is designed to enable students write acceptable summaries, reports and essays with the aid of relevant reference works. It will also enable the students to have a generalized but clear awareness of the historical development of literature in the English Language in Nigeria and in Africa, the Caribbean, the United States of America and the British Isles.  It will expose students to relevance and classification of literature and literary appreciation.

Course Content

1.     Evaluation of Common Errors in Students’ Writing:
To bring out students’ errors and locate the sources of such errors.

2.    Writing Skills:
To help students organise their ideas and write good outline.  
To raise awareness of order in texts-coherence.  
To develop text with the appropriate use of transitional devices.  
To know different kinds of writing as applied to students’ disciplines and other situations.  
To raise awareness on the technicalities of different forms of letter writing
To write formal and informal letters.

3.      Bibliography and Citations in Academic Writing:
To draw graphs, tables from descriptions.  
To write descriptions using graphs, tables and charts etc.  
To write bibliography and other references.

4.     Literary Appreciation
To know the historical development of literature across culture.
To have a general awareness of literature.
To know the relevance and classification of literature.
To study literary terms.
To appreciate the three genres of literature by studying a play, a poem and a novel.

5.      Application of the various Acquired Skills:
To write projects that will integrate the taught / acquired English Language skills.

GNS 202:    GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (1 Units)
Examination of man in a political society: the nature and role of the state; political systems; ideologies of politics; political institutions; the evolution of the Nigerian State; the Nigerian political system; constitution-making in Nigeria,  Nigeria and the international political system; problems of world politics.

Course Content:
Man as a political animal; theories of the state.  The evolution of the modern state.  Varieties of political system and institutions.  Ideologies of politics Liberalism, Conservatism, Socialism, Pan Africanism etc.  Colonialism and the Evolution of the Nigerian Politics, Structure and problems of the contemporary international  political system. Politics in Africa.  Nigeria in world politics.    

GNS 204:    LOGIC AND HISTORY OF SCIENCE  (2 Units)
Introduction to the basic principles and techniques of distinguishing correct from incorrect reasoning; evolution of science and technology; issues in the philosophy of science.

Course Content:
Nature of arguments: Deductive and inductive arguments; Validity and soundness: Validity and truth. Elementary techniques of testing validity.  Fallacies. The priori and the empirical Problems of Induction. Elements of probability. Elements of the history of science and technology. Observation, hypotheses, experiments and scientific explanation. Problems of scientific and technological development in Nigeria.  Science and society.    

FWM 201: INTRODUCTION TO FOREST AND WILDLIFE RESOURCES   MANAGEMENT  (2 UNITS)

Renewable natural resources, availability, distribution and Potential.  The important forest trees and wildlife (with emphasis on Nigerian species).  Classification, morphology, distribution and ecology of important forest and game reserves in Nigeria, silviculture; afforestation characteristics of major timber and their uses.  Felling and log transportation.  Importance of forestry in national economy.  Organisation of forest resources, non-timber resources.  Forest protection and conservation, regulation of harvest and sustained yield.

WMA 202:  INTRODUCTORY CLIMATOLOGY AND BIOGEOGRAPHY (3 Units)

Basic definitions and explanations in Climatology and Biogeography.  Climatological problems and investigation methods. Relationships with Meteorology, Biogeography and Hydrology. Climatological data processing methods; basic factors of climate formation, influence of relief on climate and plants. Geographical distribution of climatic elements, plants and animals. Climate and soil. The concept of adaptation in plants and animals.  Classification of climates and biogeography of the earth.

FST 201:    INTRODUCTION TO FOOD TECHNOLOGY (2 Units)

Philosophy and definition of food technology; and food science/technology interface.  Review of global food situation with emphasis on Nigeria: the role of agriculture in supplying food needs for economic growth and development.  Current food problems.  Physical, chemical and biological principles of food processing, preservation and storage.  Engineering units, dimensions and principles applicable to the food industry.  Interaction between food, agriculture and nutrition.  The multiple roles of food technologists in the society.

ANN 202:  INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL BIOCHEMISTRY (3 Units)
Chemical composition of plants and animal bodies. Classification, properties and functions of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, minerals and vitamins. The simple chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, minerals and vitamins.

Practicals: Testing of carbohydrates, acidic hydrolysis of starch (Polysaccharides). Tests for lipids-saturated and unsaturated. Tests for proteins. Proximate analysis of plant and animal products.



ANP 201:   COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF FARM ANIMALS (3 Units)
Comparative gross anatomy of major livestock species with emphasis on digestion, musculo-skeletal and reproductive systems. Comparative physiology of digestion, reproduction, endocrine, nervous, circulatory and excretory systems. Concept and principles of homeostasis.

Practical: Physical examination of bones, models of organs, laboratory tests and field   observation

APH 202:  INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL AGRICULTURE (3 Units)

The role of livestock in national economy. Livestock breeds and distribution in Nigeria, livestock management systems including feeding, housing, rearing etc. Introduction to Animal Breeding. Element of climate and effect of climate on animal production. Introduction to animal health and diseases. Introduction to livestock products and by-products. Record keeping on livestock farms. Common animal husbandry terminologies

Practical: Identification of different livestock species and breeds, common livestock parasites and livestock parasites and livestock products and by-products.

CSC 201: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (3 Units)

History of computer, general structure of a computer system, types classification and characteristics of a computer system and environmental conditions.  Interval representation of data, character representation, concept of data, record file, basic models of files processing and their advantages, problem slog, flow charts, algorithm, symbolic, names subscripts, expressions and control statements, computer structures and machine language, introduction to computer programming with special emphasis on BASIC and FORTRAN programming language, computer application.

STS  201:  APPLIED STATISTICS (FOR NON-MAJORS)  (3 Units)
Fundamental statistical concepts, probability theory and random variables, elementary probability distributions, binomial, poisson and normal, regression and correlation analysis, estimation, point estimation, confidence intervals for means and variances, statistical tests and hypotheses in biological and agricultural experimentations, analysis of variance, control chart for within and between batch variabilities, industrial experimentation: experimental errors, experimental design-fixed and random effects for both completely randomized and randomized blocks, latin lattice square factorial and split-plot designs.  Some non-parametric tests.


300 LEVEL COURSES
ANN 303:  PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL NUTRITION (3 Units)

Chemical composition of animal body in relation to their food. Nutrient types: energy, protein, lipids, fibre, minerals, vitamins. Nutrients for body maintenance and production – growth, pregnancy, lactation and egg production. Bioenergetics. Nutrients metabolism. Nutrient deficiency and symptoms. Concepts of nutrient requirements.

Practical: Study of the nutrient deficiency symptoms in livestock.

APH 301:  RUMINANT ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND HUSBANDRY (3 Units)
Cattle production, problems and prospects in Nigeria. Indigenous and exotic breeds of beef and dairy cattle. Dairy and beef production systems. Dairy and beef production enterprises. Sheep and goat production - breeds, management systems, feeding for growth, production and housing. Common diseases and control in cattle, sheep and goats. Marketing of animals and their products. Methods of ageing in animals. Common farm operations, handling and control of animals.

Practical: Visit to cattle, sheep and goat farms to study various management practices and disease control measures. Live animal handling and control. Animal marking and identification methods.

APH 302:  NON-RUMINANT ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND HUSBANDRY (3 Units)
Poultry production - problems and prospects. Management systems: management of broilers, layers and cockerels. Management of ducks and turkeys. Diseases and control. Hatchery enterprises. Factors affecting hatchery enterprises. Marketing and record keeping. Pig production - problems and prospects. Management systems: management of pregnant sows, piglets, growers, gilts, breeding sows and boars. Diseases and control. Planning production targets: record targets and record keeping. Pig production enterprise. Rabbit production - problems and prospects. Management systems: management of pregnant does, litters, growers, breeding does and bucks. Diseases and control. Planning production targets: record targets and record keeping. Rabbit production enterprise.
Practical: Visit to poultry, piggery and rabbit farms as well as hatcheries.

CPT 302:     INTRODUCTION TO CROP PROTECTION    (3 Units)
Pest and Disease definition. History of Plant Protection.
Insect morphology and economic importance. Common insect pests of agricultural crops. Other pests of economic importance- rodents, birds, molluscs, etc.
Characteristics of Disease agents- fungi, bacteria, viruses, nematodes. Common diseases of agricultural crops.
Parasitic plants. Common weds of agricultural crops.
Crop protection methods- cultural, biological, legislation (quarantine), hosp plant resistance, physical, chemical, integrated pest management.
Practicals:  Observation, description and identification of insect pest activities on crops.  Collection of insects and preparation of specimens for insect boxes.  Visit to insect museum. Identification of fungi, bacterial, nematodes and viral diseases of arable and permanent crops. Chemical control of pests and diseases of agricultural cros. Pesticide application, dosage calculations.

PCP 301:    CROP PRODUCTION I                (3 Units)
Manures and fertilizers. Fertilizer usage.  Mineral nutrition of  crop plants and deficiency symptoms.  Maintenance of soil fertility.    Agronomic groupings of crop plants and their characteristics: cereals, legumes, root crops, tuber crops, forage crops, oil crops, fibre crops, beverage crops, sugar crops, fruit and vegetable crops, rubber, cover crops and stimulants.  Crop management practices: site selection, land preparation, seeding, fertilizer application, weed, insect and disease management, harvesting, processing, utilization and produce storage for arable and plantation crops.  Ecological distribution of crops in Nigeria. Farming system, cropping systems and cropping patterns.  World, African and Nigerian food production problems and potential solutions.  Climatic, economic and social conditions affecting crop distribution and growth. Water requirement of crop plants: hydrophytes, mesophytes, xerophytes.

Irrigation: types, purposes, methods and problems.
Practicals: Fertilizer identification and calculation. Crop seed identification. Seed structure and vegetative morphology of cereals, legumes, fibres, root and tuber crops.  Identification of some diseases, weeds and insect pests of some crops. Effects of light on plant growth. Effects of varying moisture levels on plant growth.

SOS 312:        SOIL CHEMISTRY AND MICROBIOLOGY    (3 Units)
Introduction to soil chemistry; chemical composition of soils. Soil colloids; silicate clay chemistry.  Soil chemical processes: solubility, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, oxidation/reduction, acidity, alkalinity. Active acidity; Buffering capacity and liming. Environmental effects of fertilizer use

Structure of soil organic matter; its importance in tropical soils. Soil organisms; classification; distribution and growth requirements. Macro- and micro-fauna; macro- and microflora. Relationships between the rhizosphere and soil organisms; nitrogen fixation. Composting.  Biodegradation of pollutants and pesticides

Practical: Particle size analysis; pH determination; cation exchange capacity; organic carbon. Identifying nutrient deficiency symptoms in plants;

SOS 314:  INTRODUCTION TO PEDOLOGY AND SOIL PHYSICS      (3 Units)
Factors and processes of soil formation; rock weathering and common minerals in soil; soil morphological characteristics and profile descriptions; characterization of soils using diagnostic properties soil survey, mapping and classification

Soil texture and surface area of particles. Volume-mass relationships in soil; bulk density; porosity. Soil water; hydrologic cycle; water balance; water content and water retention; field capacity and permanent wilting point; water flow in soils. Energy balance. Soil erosion and its control; conservation tillage

Practical: Field: Soil profile description: morphology, texture by feel, color; horizon designations. Sampling soil  profile for water content and bulk density determinations. Comparing soil texture by feel with texture by particle size distribution. Soil temperature measurements in the field.


AEM 301    PRINCIPLES OF PRODUCTION ECONOMICS     (2 Units)
Concept of Production; Resource Use in Agricultural Production; Production Functions; Marginal Analysis and Concept of Profit Maximization and Cost Minimization, Allocation of Production Resources.

AEM 302:    PRINCIPLES OF FARM MANAGEMENT     (3 Units)
Definitions; scope and Importance of Farm Management; Problems and Methods of Collecting Farm Management Information; Farm Record and Accounting; Farm Business and Enterprise Management and Analysis; Farm Planning and Organization; Risk and Uncertainty in Agriculture.  Students will write a Project Report on this course.

ARD 301: EXTENSION TEACHING, LEARNING PROCESS AND METHODS  (2 Units)
Definition of learning, general principles of learning, the simple learning process, learning theories and theorists, Thorndike’s laws and principles of learning, teaching elements/components of teaching. Nature and elements of communication process. Principles of analysing communication problems in extension.  The meaning of the concepts of teaching, learning and motivation.  Steps and principles of teaching and learning.  Extension teaching methods.  Preparation and use of teaching materials and aids.

FIS 309: AQUACULTURE                 (3 UNITS)
Aims and types of aquaculture.  History, present organization and status of aquaculture in Nigeria .  Principle of aquaculture, liming and pond fertilization; food supply; selection of culture species, introduction of exotic species and their implications.  Water requirements.   Stocking, feeding and harvesting practices.   Fish farm design.  Economic consideration of aquaculture.

FWM 314:  PRINCIPLES OF AGROFORESTRY             (2 Units)
The concept of agroforestry, genesis, current development, prospects and problems.  Interlink between crop,  tree and animal husbandry..  Biological integration of agro/silvo/pastoral practices.  Role of component crops/animals in land utilization and site conservation socio-economic feasibilities and limitations.

WMA 403:  PRINCIPLES OF IRRIGATION             (3 Units)
Types of soil. Soil moisture, Field capacity, Wilting coefficient, Available water.
Water requirements of crops, consumptive use of water. Estimating evapotraspiration by Blarney-Criddle and Penman methods. Irrigation efficiencies. Effective rainfall. Net irrigation requirements, Gross irrigation requirements, Water requirements of major crops.

Quality and classification of irrigation water. Soil management, cultivation and maintenance of fertility of irrigated land, Reclamation of swampland, re-use of irrigation water. Problems of drainage, organic soils, special irrigation problems. Use of saline water and urban or industrial effluent.

500 LEVEL COURSES
AAD 501: Principles and theories of Administration (3 Units)

Definitions of Administration and Management, Differences between administration and management, Managerial and Administrative qualities, Administrative and management functions,  Supervision: types, functions of supervisor, characteristics of supervision and principles of supervision, Prerequisite for successful agricultural administration and Agricultural administration problems in Nigeria. Meaning and definition of theory, Roles of theory in agricultural administration, Types of theories in Agricultural Administration. Theories and their implications in Agricultural Administration.

AAD 502: Psychology for Agricultural Personnel (2 Units)
Psychology: Meaning, scope and importance in agricultural administration; Behaviour and its modification; methods of influencing human behaviour; Personality development, personality and individual differences; Perception: concept and importance of perception in agricultural work; Motivation: concept and theories, Learning: concept, principles, and theories of learning and experiential learning; Factors affecting learning. Principles of group dynamics.



AAD 503: Research Methods in Agricultural Administration (3 Units)
Identification and definition of research problems, objectives and hypothesis, principles of research design, Sampling techniques, questionnaire preparation, distribution and retrieval, data collection and analysis, presentation of research findings. Research methods in Agricultural Administration and application of descriptive and inferential statistics.

AAD 504: Management Communication and Leadership (2 Units)
Managerial communication process, Importance of effective communication in agricultural administration, Requirements of effective communication in an organization, Barriers to effective communication, Leadership development in agricultural and related settings; foundations of leadership theory and practice; techniques for developing leadership skills; Managerial leadership activities, Leadership styles, Qualities of leadership, Characteristics of effective leadership.

AAD 505: Personnel Management (2 Units)
Concept of human resources, Functions of a personnel department and personnel officer, Human resource planning, Job analysis, Recruitment of Agricultural personnel, the construction of an accurate job description, the process of identifying and attracting qualified candidates, and developing reliable and valid techniques for screening and selection., Placement of staff, Performance appraisal, Management of rewards and incentives, Human relations in an organization, Improvement of the quality of work life, Job Enrichment and Job Design.

AAD 506: Organization Development, Team building and Conflict resolution (2 Units)
Concept and types of organization, Organization: principles, structure, and functions,  organization relationship, Meaning of Team Building, Stages in team building, The need for team building, Group Decision making, Comparison between team and group, Principles of Conflict, Level of conflicts, Causes of conflicts, Merits and negative outcomes of conflicts, Types of organization conflicts and methods of handling organization conflicts.

AAD 507: Training and Development (2 Units)
Training, education and development: Concept, meaning and relationship between training, education and development; Purpose of industrial education and training, Concept  of courses, conferences and workshops and differences between them, training types, training needs assessment (TNA); training objectives setting; training methods, planning, designing and conducting training programmes, monitoring, evaluation and follow-up of training. Problem of industrial education and training in Nigeria.

AAD 508: Agrarian Laws (2 Units)
Meaning of law and sources of Nigerian law, Meaning of tort and its relevance to Agricultural administration, The law of contract and its effect on land acquisition, Nigerian land decree , problems and prospects, The definition of negotiable instruments and types of negotiable instruments, Nature and legal interpretation of agricultural goods.

AAD 510: Programme Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (2 Units)
Meaning of programme planning, Need for programme planning, Principles of programme planning, Steps in programme planning, Priority setting in programme planning, Factors influencing choice of criteria for priority setting, Concept of strategic planning, Concept of involvement and participation, Why programme planning is difficult in Nigeria, Monitoring of agricultural programme,  Evaluation, Types of evaluation, differences and similarities between monitoring and evaluation.

AEM 502:    BUSINESS MANAGEMENT         (3 Units)
The role of Management in Business.  The Structure of Organization.  Authority and Authority and Responsibility; Co-ordination; Forecasting; Planning and the Formulation of  Policy, Personnel Administration;, Purchasing and Stock Control; The Role  of Communication; Industrial “Relation; Control Management, Accounting and Efficiency; Research  and Development.

AEM 506:    INTERNATIONAL TRADE             (2 Units)
Genesis of Trade; International Trade and Economic Expansion; Export and Import Policies; Marketing/Commodity Boards; Balance of Payment Adjustments; Tariffs and Infant Industry Argument.  International trade Agreements; Cartels and Economic Regionalism; International  Organization; Technology Transfer and Impacts on Commodity Development.

AEM 508:    AGRICULTURAL FINANCE             (2 Units)
Need and role of Credit in Agricultural Development; Sources of Agricultural Finance; Decision Criteria in Agricultural Investments; Factors affecting  Supply and  effective Utilization of credits; Classification of Credits, Credit Assessment ( the 5Cs of Credit).

AEM 509:    PROJECT MANAGEMENT             (3 Units)
Project and Economic Development; The Project Cycle, determination of Project and Need; Criteria for selection of Projects; Technical, Commercial and Organization, Feasibility; Project Execution and Management; Project Financing; Project Appraisal, Monitoring and Evaluation; Project Refinancing.

ARD 505:  PRODUCTION AND USE OF AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS     (2 Units)
Types of audio-visual instructional materials (e.g. transparencies, slides, tapes, video, television, radio, etc). Training and design, development and presentation of audio-visual aids; Principles and techniques of utilization of audio-visual materials.  Uses of audio-visual aids; Principles and teaching; Maintenance of audio-visual equipment and materials.
NOTE: (Lecture - 1 hour, Practical - 6 hours per week).

ARD 509: RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTING       (2 Units)
Introduction to development of radio and television broadcasting, Principles and practice of radio and television broadcasting.  Audience analysis. Types of radio and television programmes, i.e. radio and TV talks, discussion, news, commentaries, youth, adult and family programmes. Special interest programmes, i.e. agricultural features, magazines, documentaries, drama and music.

HRT 502:    PLANTATION CROPS PRODUCTION (POMOLOGY)    (2 Units)
Climatic and soil requirements. Fruit tree propagation, selection and preparation of nursery site of cacao, kola, oil palm, citrus, cashew, coffee and rubber, etc. Plantation/orchard establishment: site selection, layout, and land preparation, planning. Crop management/improvement practices. Chemical weed and pest control. Harvesting: Seed control, preservation, storage, packaging, processing and marketing.

ANN 503 :  RUMINANT ANIMAL NUTRITION (3 Units)
The nature of ruminant stomach reviewed. Physiology, microbiology and biochemistry of the rumen. Utilization of roughages in ruminant feeding. Use of agro-industrial by-products in ruminant feeding. The importance and methods of protein by-pass in ruminant feeding. Non-protein nitrogen utilization, nutrient partition, nutritional disorders.

Practicals: Methods of protecting protein. Ration mixing. Examination of a typical ruminant’s stomach and compartments. Balance trials. Nutritional disorder. Agro-industrial by-products used in ruminant animal feeding and their processing methods.

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